AG ONE Newsletter June 29, 2018

FARMLAND PROTECTION BILL SIGNED INTO LAW

On June 24, Governor Tom Wolf signed House Bill 2468 into law as Act 45 of 2018.  This legislation restricts school districts and townships from seizing preserved farmland without justifying (no other available options) the acquisition before the county’s Orphan’s Court.  HB 2468 addresses two separate school district actions in Cumberland and Montgomery Counties.  The bill was sponsored by Representatives Warren Kampf, Marcy Toepel, and Kate Harper, all Montgomery County Republicans.

AGRI-TOURISM BILLS MOVE

Sponsored by Senator Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster), bills limiting liability for farmers engaged in agri-tourism or agri-entertainment are continuing their movement in the PA General Assembly.  Senate Bill 819 which defines agri-tourism passed the Senate June 18 by a 48-0 vote and was referred to the House Agriculture & Rural Affairs Committee June 20.  Companion Senate Bill 820 which provides limited liability immunity was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee and is on the Senate’s calendar.

HOUSE ADOPTS PENNVEST AUDIT RESOLUTION

On June 22, the PA House adopted House Resolution 948 calling upon State Auditor General Eugene DePasquale to audit records of the PA Infrastructure Investment Authority, also known as PENNVEST, as they relate to nonpoint source program projects.  According to prime sponsor Rep. Martin Causer (R-Cameron/McKean/Potter), “many questions have been raised about transactions in which PENNVEST financed the purchase of 60,000 acres of private forest land in north central and northwestern PA.”

SENATE APPROVES NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT BILL

The Senate voted 49-0 on June 20 for Senate Bill 1171 (Brooks-R-Mercer/Crawford/Erie/Warren) to create the Farm Animal Advisory Board as a replacement for the Nutrient Management Advisory Board so as to provide greater input by animal farmers in the regulatory process concerning nutrient compliance rules.

SELECTED LEGISLATIVE ITEMS

  • Approved by the Senate 48-0 on June 18 were two members of the PA Milk Marketing Board, Robert Barley and Carol Hardbarger.  Barley was also appointed to USDA’s National Fluid Milk Processor Promotion Board by Secretary Sonny Perdue on June 19.
  • Signed into law as Act 43 of 2018 by Governor Wolf on June 22 was House Bill 2477 (Watson-R-Bucks) furthering research in medical marijuana.
  • Adopted by the PA House was House Resolution 971 proclaiming “Pollinator Week” in PA (Matzie D-Allegheny/Beaver).  Adopted by the Senate was Senate Resolution 403 (Aument-R-Lancaster) declaring June as “Dairy Month” in PA.

DAIRY RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY SENATE

Another piece of legislation sponsored by Senator Aument was adopted by the PA Senate June 18.  Senate Resolution 382 calls upon the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to prevent labeling products billing themselves as “milk” from using that term unless they are true dairy.  This would include products such as soy, almond, and most recently peas from marketing with the term “milk” when they are not dairy products.

The second resolution adopted June 18 is Senate Resolution 384 sponsored by Senator Judy Schwank (D-Berks), Minority Chair, Senate Agriculture & Rural Affairs Committee.  SR 384 directs the Legislative Budget & Finance Committee to identify and examine the statutes, best practices and proposed measures of other States to provide assistance to dairy producers during these economic times. The Legislative Budget and Finance Committee will also identify the number and types of specialty dairy products, such as lactose free milk, that are sold in the Commonwealth by out of state dairy producers and examine how milk produced in the Commonwealth can be utilized to meet the increased demand for this specialty dairy products market.”  (Source:  Sen. Schwank’s sponsorship memo)

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION REPORT RELEASED

The Wolf Administration released an agriculture workforce development educational program report in June as a result of collaboration between the PA Departments of Agriculture and Education.  Details:  http://www.agriculture.pa.gov/Documents/Agriculture%20Education%20Report.pdf

DEADLINES

  • July 6, 2018 is the deadline for the Department of Environmental Protection to receive online applications for private companies “repowering” trucks and other equipment.  The PA Clean Diesel Grant Program received part of the national $118 million Federal settlement with Volkswagon.  Details: Samantha Harmon at DEP, 717-787-9495; www.dep.pa.gov/driveforward
  • July 20, 2018 is the date by which farmers should file actual acreage reports for Crop Insurance.  Another Crop Insurance date to remember is July 31st, the enrollment deadline for forage seeding protection.  Details: Jordan Stasyszyn at PDA, 717-787-6901
  • October 12, 2018 is the deadline for corn producers, grain handling facilities, or ethanol production facilities to enter into the Settlement Agreement with Syngenta over lawsuits alleging that marketing a GMO seed disrupted U.S. corn market prices.  Details and a scam warning: www.cornseedsettlement.com; 833-567-2676.

AG ONE Newsletter May 8, 2018

BROADBAND CAUCUS ESTABLISHED IN HOUSE

Rural Broadband access champions Representatives Kristin Phillips-Hill (R-York) and Pam Snyder (D-Greene/Fayette/Washington) have formed a caucus to urge adoption of Broadband legislation.  They have already introduced a package of bills addressing lack of access in rural areas:  House Resolution 431 calling for an audit of a special Broadband fund administered by the PA Department of Education; House Resolution 429 establishing a legislative task force on delivery of high-speed Broadband services; House Resolution 430 which directs the State Government Commission and the Legislative Budget & Finance Committee to see if non-rural telephone companies are meeting their legal obligations in providing access to Internet services to rural residents; and House Bill 1642 which directs that there be an inventory of state-owned structures that could also be used to expand access.

In addition, on May 3, House Bill 2320 sponsored by Rep. Snyder was referred to the House Consumer Affairs Committee.  HB 2320 would increase the state requirement for band width ten-fold to match the Federal standard as set forth in the Connect America initiative.

HOUSE PASSES CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION PACKAGE

On April 30, a bipartisan group of nine bills was approved by the House to boost Career and Technical Education (CTE):  House Bill 2155 reforms CTE teacher requirements by emphasizing work experience.  House Bill 2156 provides tax credits to businesses investing in CTE.  House Bill 2157 attempts to speed up classifications of instructional programs including agriculture.

Of note is House Bill 2203 sponsored by Rep. Pat Harkin (D-Erie) to have the PA Departments of Agriculture, Education, and Labor & Industry work jointly to develop an online career resource center.

REGULATORY REFORM LEGISLATION TAKES CENTER STAGE IN HOUSE

The House voted for bills to provide greater legislative control over PA’s regulatory system.

  • House Bill 1960 (Ellis-R-Butler) requires that each agency appoint a regulatory compliance officer, enabling the regulated community to better understand regulations and provide them with an informal way to resolve noncompliance issues before penalties.
  • House Bill 1792 (Benninghoff-R-Centre) gives the General Assembly the power to void existing regulation providing both House and Senate pass it and the Governor signs it.  Once a regulation is voided, an agency may not re-issue the same regulation unless specifically authorized by a new law.  A legislative committee may report a concurrent resolution to initiate repeal of an existing regulation after a public hearing is held.
  • House Bill 1237 (Keefer-R-York) mandates that a proposed regulation with an impact of one million dollars or more per year on business have a concurrence vote by the General Assembly, thus giving legislators veto power over economically significant regulations.
  • House Bill 209 (Phillips-Hill-R-York) establishes an independent Office of the Repealer.  That position’s duty is to review existing regulations and recommend repeal if they are obsolete or “if it finds the existing regulation(s) to be contrary to the public interest.”
  • House Bill 1959 (Rothman-R-Cumberland) requires all agencies that issue permits to increase transparency through the permitting process.

COMMITTEE VOTES TO ADDRESS HUNTER TRESPASS PROBLEM

On May 1st, the House Game & Fisheries Committee voted for House Bill 1603 (B. Miller-Lancaster) to make hunting while trespassing on private property a primary offense.  This changes current law which says that trespassing can only be charged if there is another violation of the Game Code.  Penalty is losing one’s hunting license for up to one year.

OTHER LEGISLATIVE DEVELOPMENTS

  • A bill to amend the Vehicle Code to increase the standard truck trailer width from 96 to 102 inches (House Bill 1699 sponsored by Rep. Jim Marshall-R-Beaver) is now in the Senate Transportation Committee after passage by the PA House.
  • House Bill 2034, (Marshall) is now in the Senate Agriculture & Rural Affairs Committee after 195-0 House passage.  It provides for agricultural liming materials labeling.
  • On May 1st, the House approved House Bill 1800 (Nelson-R-Westmoreland) for pharmacists to provide and insurers to pay for partial prescriptions in order to synchronize fill or refill dates.  This would reduce the numbers of people (rural elderly for example) who do not take their medications due to difficulties in getting to a pharmacy.

 

UPCOMING

  • May 20:  The PA Milk Marketing Board will hold a hearing on if and how the Milk Marketing Law should be changed.  Details: ra-pmmb@pa.gov
  • June 5:  The House Agriculture & Rural Affairs Committee will convene a hearing on Senate Bill 792 (Alloway-R-Franklin).  This legislation is a major re-write of rules regarding fertilizer.  It includes registration, labeling, and inspections as well as citing penalties for misbranding, adulteration, or actual weight being “shorter” than listed weight.  Following is a link to the actual language as there are also technical listings.  NOTE:  When reading, start on page 68.  http://www.legis.state.pa.us/CFDOCS/Legis/PN/Public/btCheck.cfm?txtType=PDF&sessYr=2017&sessInd=0&billBody=S&billTyp=B&billNbr=0792&pn=1547

AG ONE Newsletter December 22, 2017

This end-of-year issue focuses on several resources available to those involved in agriculture.  AG ONE Newsletter hopes that these will be of value to you as you plan for the New Year.  If you know of others, please let us know and AG ONE Newsletter will post them.

BUSINESS & FARM RESOURCES

  • The PA Department of Community & Economic Development announced the Pipeline Investment Program to help communities use some of the natural gas being produced in the Commonwealth. Specifically, it provides grants to construct the last few miles of natural gas distribution lines to business parks and existing manufacturing and industrial firms.  The maximum grant is not more than one million dollars or 50% of project costs, whichever is less. Details: 866-466-3972
  • REAP (Resource Enhancement and Protection) application packets for 2017-18 are available.  REAP provides tax credits for agricultural producers who make equipment purchases that reduce run-off of nutrients and sediment.  It is administered by the State Conservation Commission which provides support to county conservation districts.  Applications are on a first-come, first served basis.  Farmers may receive tax credits up to $150,000 per agricultural operation for 50-75 percent of the project’s cost.  Details: Joel Semke 717-705-4032 or jsemke@pa.gov.
  • The PA Department of Agriculture is using a grant from the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) to subsidize training for produce farmers on their compliance responsibilities under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).  The subsidy is $130 out of the $150 registration fee so the net cost is $20.  Information and dates of workshops follow: https://extension.psu.edu/fsma-grower-training
  • January 18: Leesport, Berks County
  • January 29: Hershey, Dauphin County
  • February 13: Greensburg, Westmoreland County
  • February 20: Center Valley, Lehigh County
  • February 28: Lancaster, Lancaster County
  • March 6: University Park, Centre County
  • March 8: Biglerville, Adams County
  • The Center for Dairy Excellence is offering grants to dairy farmers to establish a team approach in planning for profitability, farm succession, and “Dairy Transformation”.  These grants are used to assemble a team of advisors and a facilitator and range from $2,000 to $5,000 (more if the Dairy Transformation farm plan involves a renewable energy component.)  Details: “Business Tools” tab on www.centerfordairyexcellence.org or Melissa Anderson 717-346-0849
  • PA Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has a specialized program, the Agricultural Plan Reimbursement Program, which can cover some of the costs of technical help on plans for pollutant reduction in local streams and rivers.  Deadline to register to participate in the program is April 1, 2018.  Details: Sara Bolton 570-374-5700, sbolton@larsondesignergroup.com for northern counties in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and Jedd Moncavage 717-721-6795 jeddm@teamaginc.com for southern counties in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS

  • Center for Dairy Excellence is accepting applications for a summer internship in its Harrisburg office.  DEADLINE IS DECEMBER 31, 2017.  Details: Mary Foote 717-346-0849, mfoote@centerfordairyexcellence.org
  • PA Farm Bureau’s PA Friends of Agriculture is offering scholarships to PFB families to students enrolling at Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences or Delaware Valley University College of Agriculture.  In addition, a large animal veterinary studies scholarship is available.  Details: https://www.pfb.com/the-foundation/scholarships
  • PA State Grange offers the Rhone Scholarship to Grange members and families attending Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, the PA State Grange Foundation Scholarship, and a Deaf Interpreter Scholarship for those Grange members enrolled in a certification program as an interpreter for the deaf.  Details:  www.pagrange.org
  • National Farmers Union has two scholarships for NFU members.  Details: 202-554-1600, http://nfu.org/education/scholarships
  • Delaware Valley University has 70-plus scholarships listed.  http://www.delval.edu/offices-services/financial-aid/scholarships
  • Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences lists scholarships by major for each of the 23 majors, from Agribusiness to Wildlife & Fisheries Science.  http://agsci.psu.edu/students/scholarships/scholarships
  • Specialized Scholarships:
  • National Dairy Herd Information Association (DHIA) is offering $1,500 scholarships to third or fourth year veterinary students who plan to work in dairy, dairy medicine and are interested in using software and dairy records to aid in dairy management. Details: Holly Thompson, hollyanne1001@gmail.com
  • American Society for Endology & Viticulture offers aid to those intending to have a career in the wine or grape industry. Details: http://asev.org/pod/apply-asev-scholarship
  • Center for Dairy Excellence lists a number of dairy scholarships: National Dairy Promotion & Research Board, National Dairy Shrine, PA Dairy Promotion Program, Dairy Science Scholarship (Delaware Valley University), PA Dairy Innovation Scholarship (Penn State).  Details: 717-346-0849 Jayne Sebright, http://centerfordairyexcellence.org/scholarships
  • Foundation for Rural Service (Rural Broadband Association/NTCA). Details: foundation@frs.org

AG ONE Newsletter November 28, 2017

Update on Farm Show “Lease Lease-Back”

Backdrop

On October 9, Governor Tom Wolf announced that he was unilaterally seeking a way to resolve the FY 2017-18 State Budget impasses with House Republicans by raising capital of up to $200 million from leasing the Farm Show Complex. Since then, various revenue measures were adopted by the General Assembly and signed into law to cover the deficit. Since the revenue legislation included borrowing ahead from future Master Tobacco Settlement payments to Pennsylvania totaling $1.5 billion, Governor Wolf dropped another initiative, to “securitize” or borrow ahead from future PA Liquor Control Board profits. The Farm Show financing process continued with bids from private sector investors starting October 13 and closing November 13. Four bids were received and the PA Department of General Services and PA Office of the Budget are reviewing them. A date has not been given as to when the winning bid will be announced.

What is the actual transaction taking place?

Called a lease lease-back, the transaction more closely resembles a home equity loan. Perhaps the Administration could have been clearer in explaining what financial investments were being done here. It would have reduced confusion among stakeholders.

Is it legal for the Governor to take this action without getting the prior consent of the General Assembly, especially since the legislature decides how much of the Commonwealth’s dollars the Farm Show will receive?

Yes. This is not a surprise to the General Assembly. Governor Tom Wolf made it very clear that he intended to do this when he gave his Budget Address to the General Assembly in February 2017. In addition, the issue was discussed at a Senate committee meeting and at innumerable separate meetings. Before deciding to take an equity loan on the Farm Show Complex, Administration legal counsel also determined that the Governor had the legal authority to make such a move.

Doesn’t this need an OK from the Farm Show’s governing body?

No. That board works on operations, not on financing arrangements such as this.

Will the Farm Show lose its ability to decide programming and conduct daily operations or will the new “owner” be able to decide how the Farm Show is managed and what shows will be held? For example, can the Farm Show Manager be ordered to do something the new “owner” wants such as more gun shows or detests (no gun shows)?

First, the word “owner” is incorrect. Whoever provides the capital for this equity loan is not the owner. The owner remains the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The contract has iron-clad language preventing any outside control. It is similar to a home equity loan where the lender does not have the legal authority to tell you what wallpaper to use or what has to be planted outside. The homeowner is the owner. With the Farm Show Complex, PA retains ownership.

The Office of the Budget frequently uses outside legal counsel as well as relying on attorney employees of the state to make sure PA’s interests are not compromised. Besides, any investor is making its money from interest paid on the loan and is not interested in managing the Farm Show Complex.

Will this new money be dedicated for remodeling and updating the physical structure of the Farm Show Complex?

No. This money will go into the General Fund to help balance the deficit. There is a separate effort to generate money for Farm Show renovations and updating HVAC, etc.

When the Governor said he would “securitize” future profits from the PA Liquor Control Board, he was very specific about the amount of money would be generated and the amount of interest that would be paid to service the loan. Why are there no specifics here? The PA Liquor Control Board plan is part of PA State Government so the details were known regarding the amount borrowed and the interest to pay back the loan. This seeks private sector financing and the costs connected with the equity loan would depend on the investor’s desired return on investment. Likewise, although the figure $200 million has been used publically as the amount that could be generated, the actual figure borrowed will depend on what bidders promise.

*****

CORRECTION TO AG ONE Newsletter 2017.18

In AG ONE Newsletter 2017.18, a legislative status report described House Bill 944 establishing a Commission for Agriculture Education Excellence as being in committee. That legislation was grafted into another School Code bill, House Bill 178 PN 2609 (Act 55 of 2017) which became law November 6 without the Governor’s signature. Text begins on page 45, Section 1549.1. .http://www.legis.state.pa.us/CFDOCS/Legis/PN/Public/btCheck.cfm?txtType=PDF&sessYr=2017&sessInd=0 &billBody=H&billTyp=B&billNbr=0178&pn=2609 This establishes the Commission for Agricultural Education Excellence to assist in developing a statewide plan for agriculture education and to coordinate PDA and Education Department efforts in doing so.

Thanks to PSCFO members Amy Bradford from PennAg Industries Association and Dr. MeeCee Baker from Versant Strategies for spotting the need for this update.

AG ONE Newsletter October 30, 2017

BUDGET SAGA (FINALLY) ENDS

Update:

Please note the following updates to the AG ONE Newsletter below posted earlier today. These were signed into law today by Governor Tom Wolf:


HB 790
sponsored by House Agriculture & Rural Affairs Minority Chair Eddie Day Pashinski (D-Luzerne) (controlled and noxious weeds) is Act 46

HB 542
Tax Code (taxes on fireworks, $1.5 billion loan from Tobacco Settlement, etc.) is now Act 43.

HB 785 Capital Facilities Debt Act (state indebtedness levels) is now Act 45.

HB 674 Fiscal Code (takes $200 million from an insurance company reserves; gives Governor discretion as to where $300 million will come from dedicated funds) is now Act 44

HB 118
(Labor & Industry inspection fees) is now Act 40.

SB 651
Capital Budget (authorization wish list for wide variety of state bricks and mortar projects) is now Act 52.

HB 271 (expands gambling in hopes of generating $200 million more revenue to the state) is now Act 42.

*****

With House action October 25 and 26, the revenue side to the State Budget was sent to Governor Wolf for his signature.  He has ten days to approve, veto, or let the legislation go into effect without his signature.  Some major elements include:

  • Borrowing of $1.5 billion from future payments to Pennsylvania from the Tobacco Master Settlement to be paid back within 30 years  NOTE:  House Bill 542, page 271 http://www.legis.state.pa.us/CFDOCS/Legis/PN/Public/btCheck.cfm?txtType=PDF&sessYr=2017&sessInd=0&billBody=H&billTyp=B&billNbr=0542&pn=2598
  • Taking $200 million from reserves held by the Joint Underwriting Association (JUA), the medical malpractice insurer of last resort.  The Administrative Code bill specifies that if JUA does not hand over the money by December 1st, it will be abolished.  JUA says that it is illegal for the state to “seize” insurance company reserves and that it will sue to prevent this from occurring.  NOTE: House Bill 674, Article II-D, section 201-D  page 14: Similar language is found in House Bill 118 but this specifies that the Supreme Court shall have exclusive jurisdiction to hear any challenge. http://www.legis.state.pa.us/CFDOCS/Legis/PN/Public/btCheck.cfm?txtType=PDF&sessYr=2017&sessInd=0&billBody=H&billTyp=B&billNbr=0674&pn=2624
  • $200 million to come from gambling expansion (House Bill 271)
  • Senate Bill 651, the Capitol Budget, is a bricks and mortar wish list for projects funded by the Commonwealth.  Just because projects are listed here does not mean that the money is actually there. This is an authorization bill.  Examples for Capital Budget items might be a new barn for the Farm Show complex or significant upgrading to a state building HVAC system.
  • New Labor & Industry inspection fees schedule (boilers, elevators, ski lifts, etc. are found in Administrative Code bill, House Bill 118 starting on page 12.  www.legis.state.pa.us
  • New taxes on fireworks: 12% for consumers buying fireworks; annual fees ranging from $2,000 to $20,000 for permanent structures selling fireworks; and $3,000 per year for temporary structures.  One miscellaneous insurance provision is a $50,000 bond requirement for municipal fireworks displays.  (HB 542 page 257 dealing with new taxes on fireworks)

FARM SHOW LOAN IN LIMBO

In limbo is the Governor’s unilateral decision October 4 to borrow ahead (“securitize”) future profits from the PA Liquor Control Board and his October 9 pronouncement that PA would take out an equity loan on the Farm Show Complex owned by the state.  His rationale was that he would take budget matters into his own hands, absent a legislative resolution to the State Budget impasse. PSCFO has requested a meeting with Governor Wolf to discuss the Farm Show Complex loan issue.

AND…THERE IS A SLEEPER BUDGET ISSUE.

House Bill 674 contains this section:  SECTION 1726-G.FUND TRANSFERS.

DURING THE 2017-2018 FISCAL YEAR, $300,000,000 SHALL BE

TRANSFERRED FROM AMOUNTS AVAILABLE IN SPECIAL FUNDS AND

RESTRICTED ACCOUNTS TO THE GENERAL FUND.

This is the ultimate outcome of those seeking to balance the State Budget by taking monies from over 50 specified dedicated funds.  The Senate derailed that notion but this final language gives the Governor the discretionary authority to decide from which funds this $300 million shall come.  HB 674 does not contain language limiting his choices so they might or might not be  agriculture or environmental funds. PSCFO sent a heads up memo to Council members about this section.

SENATE BANKING & INSURANCE COMMITTEE HOLDS RX PRICE HEARING

On October 23, the Senate Banking & Insurance Committee convened a prescription drug price transparency hearing relative to Senate Bill 637 (White-R-Indiana).  It presented starkly contrasting views between the pharmaceutical industry which maintained that manufacturing costs increases are quite reasonable versus insurers and prescription benefit managers (PBMs) which pointed accusing fingers at the drug industry for unwarranted price increases.  Testimony also came from the PA State Grange which said that price transparency could give insurance companies the ability to negotiate more effectively because they could compare pricing practices between states, such as a hypothetical Epi-pen charge of $150 in one state versus $600 in PA.

WEED BILL GOES TO GOVERNOR (No, not that weed…)

Presented to the Governor October 25 was House Bill 790 regarding controlled and noxious weeds.  Prime sponsor is House Agriculture & Rural Affairs Minority Chair Eddie Day Pashinski (D-Luzerne).

EXPECT WORKERS’ COMPENSATION HIKES

The PA Compensation Rating Bureau (PCRB) revised loss cost filing goes into effect November 1st. This translates into a general increase in Workers’ Compensation premiums of 6.06%, necessary to adapt to the Supreme Court striking down a major provision of the Workers’ Compensation Act regarding permanent  impairment evaluation standards.

YOUTH GARDENING GRANTS up to $500 will be awarded by Katie’s Krops.  Eligible are youths aged 9-16.  Harvests must be donated to food banks.  Application deadline is December 31.  Details:  http://www.katieskrops.com/start-a-garden.html House Bill 790 (Pashinski-D-Luzerne) passed the Senate 49-0 on October 18 and was referred to the House Rules Committee.  The House now must consider amendments made to the bill in the Senate.

Various Notes

  • PDA asked gardeners to be on the lookout for Boxwood Blight, a fungal disease-causing sudden leaf loss and possible death of these popular evergreen shrubs. It has been found in nine states and in nine PA counties: Bucks, Carbon, Chester, Columbia, Cumberland, Lancaster, Philadelphia, Schuylkill, and Warren. Those affected are asked to take samples to Extension before destroying the potentially impacted plant.
  • PSCFO member Hunger-Free PA announced that the PA Food Safety Coalition will convene October 16, 2015 in Harrisburg. Details: sachristopher@pafoodbanks.org.
  • Native Americans college students majoring in agriculture or related disciplines may be eligible for one of five $1,000 scholarships from First Nations Development Institute. Application deadline is September 30, 2015. Details: Kendall Tallmadge at 303-774-7836 or ktallmadge@firstnations.org

Scholarship News

  • Scholarships$3,000 Student Leader Scholarship applications from the Center for Dairy Excellence Foundation and the PA Dairymens’ Association are due June 1.  Details: www.centerfordairyexcellence.org Jayne Sebright 717/552-3865. (PA residents planning or currently enrolled in Dairy & Animal Science, Ag Marketing & Business, or related fields.)
  • $1,000 PA Association of Conservation Districts applications are due May 31.  Details: http://pacd.org/education/scholarships/  (PA college students majoring in an agriculture or environmental field)

2015: International Year of Soils

SoilsOn December 5, USDA announced that it was promoting the United Nations’ designation of 2015 as the International Year of Soils, an effort to promote the importance of soils in everyday life.

According to the media release, the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization spearheaded the international effort because the “year of awareness aims to increase understanding of the importance of soil for food security and essential ecosystem functions.”  Details: www.nrcs.usda.gov/.

There may be some state specific observances of the International Year of Soils organized by the PA Association of Professional Soil Scientists, details pending.

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